Modular

Defending Modular Buildings

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On August, 29, 2011 The Gazette published a response article in defense of modular buildings.

In Defence of Modular Buildings

” Re: “Failing grade for trailers” (Gazette, Aug. 6).

 

 

The Gazette’s story on emergency classrooms in Haiti called into question the quality and durability of those modular classrooms.

The reporters cited issues such as “incredible heat, unsatisfactory sanitation facilities, lack of ventilation, leaks, mould and, in one case, high levels of formaldehyde,” as well as questioning whether they are, as billed, hurricane-proof.

In 2004, four hurricanes hit Florida, causing over $50 billion in property damage. What went underreported was the fact that 1,600 manufactured homes built to the 1994 wind standards of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development were hit by those hurricanes.

How many were blown off their foundations? None.

How many were destroyed? Zero. Based on reading The Gazette’s story, would readers know that those classrooms, if properly installed, could withstand 140-mile-per-hour hurricane winds?

The story also said that the modular classrooms did not have running water and latrines. Imagine Haiti’s devastation. There are problems with infrastructure, transportation, shortages of materials and a host of other things.

Bathrooms in classrooms require hookups to sewer lines. There is no failure in design or construction if proper utility hookups were not done.

On the reported issues with air quality and mould: no air conditioning was evident in the photos, and it was not mentioned in the story. These modular units were probably designed to have air conditioning installed on site. Without air conditioning in a highly humid climate, mould could form. Blame nature, but not the builder or those who provided humanitarian relief.

Formaldehyde exists in most construction. It is found in building materials, resins and fabrics. It is also part of your body chemistry. Energy-efficient construction is “tighter,” so formaldehyde’s effects on the eyes in hot conditions are more acute. Air conditioning is a solution.

Can we believe that those involved wanted to do a bad job for Haitians? We do not know enough to cast blame on anyone or anything, other than the difficult conditions in Haiti.

Modular and pre-fab construction is used worldwide in commercial, office and residential housing. More than 20 million people in the U.S. and Canada live in factory-built homes.

Hundreds of thousands are employed by the industry and its suppliers. The article does an injustice to builders of manufactured and modular homes and those who dwell in them by using derogatory terms like “trailer.” The media should use proper terminology and avoid outdated stereotypes.

L.A. (Tony) Kovach Publisher, Manufactured Home Marketing Sales Management (MHMSM.com) Chicago

© Copyright (c) The Montreal Gazette

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/defence+modular+buildings/5320959/story.html#ixzz1XH4gnNfd

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Modular

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Modular Construction News released a great article on how modular units are now being used in the Department of Corrections using steel units for cells. You can find a full version of the article here: www.modularconstructionnews.com

 

Modular Units: Construction Method Offers Quick, Inexpensive Solution
By Peter Krasnow, FAIA
By Peter Krasnow, FAIA
Modular construction is an option that can accommodate program and building needs within a short time frame at a cost that is usually significantly less than conventional construction.

For correctional industry application the construction method has generally been narrowly focused on housing low-security populations in modular buildings, or higher security populations in precast concrete or steel-cell modular units. It is a method that has helped numerous jurisdictions get out of a bind, and decision makers at federal, state and local levels responsible for funding criminal justice building programs regularly consider it. However, modular construction is not always a catchall solution and some key factors must be considered before it is used at a new or existing facility.

Available Units and Systems

Early modular buildings used in the correctional setting were often created by combining12-foot-by-60-foot pre-manufactured units. Several companies manufactured the units — including SpaceMaster, Arthur Industries and Gelco — but the buildings sometimes had trouble enduring the wear-and-tear atmosphere at correctional facilities.

 
A modular housing unit was built for inmates at the Canyon County Jail in Idaho.

“New Jersey’s Department of Corrections built an entire minimum-security prison with Arthur system in the early 1980s in southern New Jersey,” says Robert T. Goble, AICP, principal at Carter Goble Companies. “I did an assessment of it for NIC after about five years of operation and found it to be deteriorating (as you would expect with wooden member structures in a correctional environment) and questioned whether it would last the entire 15 years the state had expected.”

Another early entry into modular building construction was built in New Jersey in the early 1990s.

“We successfully completed a 42,000 square-foot multi-story, medium-security correctional facility and administrative/visitor center for Hudson County, N.J., using modular unit construction,” syas Mickey Rosenberg, director of Mark Correctional Systems at Kullman Industries.

There are several modular building designs available that address the low-security needs of facility administrators. General Marine Leasing, Sprung Instant Structures, Miller Modular Construction and American Modular Technologies are some of the companies that specialize in modular buildings. They essentially provide large rectangular enclosures with open floor plan configurations that include bunk beds, and in some units, a separate toilet/lavatory/shower area. A few manufacturers have had success providing their products to correctional facilities for temporary use that occasionally result in permanent housing environments.

 
Modular concrete cell units can be lifted into place to reduce construction cost and save time.

Manufacturers such as Rotondo/Weirich and Old Castle Precast Modular Group supply concrete modular cells. Kullman Industries specializes in steel-cell modular units.

Modular building and modular cell construction both provide viable solutions. The option that is best for an individual facility is determined by security needs.

Security and Safety

Security will always be an important, if not critical requirement for facilities that house prisoners.

When planning modular buildings, clear lines of sight must be included in the architectural design to enhance an officer’s responsibilities for good management. Although officers are encouraged to walk about the space in a direct supervision environment, it is important that they also have clear observation from a desk position. During planning, it’s a necessity that communication between the manufacturer, facility operator and professional advisor be open and unimpeded.

Modular concrete cells provide a uniform secure holding area for high-security inmates and they also can provide significant savings if the cells are poured and manufactured on-site.

“Precast modular cells provide the security benefit of uniformity in quality, tolerances and finishes for joints, cast-in doors and frames, and fixtures and furnishings,” says Steve Weirich, owner of Rotondo/Weirich Enterprises. “Eliminating possible hiding places for contraband is inherent to their concrete construction. With on-site precast modular construction, modular contractors are pouring quad cell modules with monolithic mezzanine balconies, further reducing joints and adding to the long-term integrity of new facilities.

“When cell modules are cast on prison job sites at dimensions larger than the allowance for road travel, the number of building components decreases, thereby providing a more seamless, secure structure.”

Relative Costs of Modular Units

Prefabricated unit costs vary significantly. Units can be purchased on a square-foot basis or, more typically, on total building size based on typical housing units of 50 to 100 prisoners.

 
Amenities such as day rooms and officer stations can be created with modular construction.

Estimating the cost of a modular unit system against conventional building must consider the amount of time saved with modular construction to obtain the true value for cost comparisons.

Speed of delivery to respond to immediate housing needs may be the primary reason for choosing a modular unit rather than pursuing conventional construction. In some instances, although these temporary structures outlast their life expectancy, they remain in place in lieu of building permanent units requiring a commitment of funds. In other cases, once they have served their purpose on a short-term basis and funding becomes available they can be removed and a permanent facility constructed.

“I have found that although the cost for modular units can parallel conventional construction, depending upon the region of the country, the speed clearly makes the difference,” says Roger Lichtman, AIA, of The Lichtman Associates (see Page 16 for more on Lichtman). “More often than not, time translates directly to money. In one previous experience, utilizing modular technology we were able to design and build, through the toughest weather of the year, a 192-bed permanent facility. These units are not the wood frame trailers of the past. They are built of the same materials used in conventional construction.

“From the time our contract was signed for architectural services until the time that inmates were moved in was a period of less than six months. Conventional design and construction would have taken three times as long. Twelve years later, the facility still houses 192 inmates in the best of conditions with minimal facility maintenance. To this day, the client remains an excellent reference for us.”

Your Project Needs

With budgets running out of control at all levels of government, it may be prudent to consider modular construction for upcoming projects since the method can be more affordable, faster to deliver and the potential procurement pitfalls of conventional contracting processes could be avoided.

In certain jurisdictions, these units can be purchased directly from a manufacturer without the requirement of procurement regulations associated with retaining services through a conventional request-for-proposals solicitation process. The RFP and interview process can often become very time consuming. If overcrowding or another crises at the facility is particularly bad, emergency measures can sometimes be declared to secure funding.

In many jurisdictions throughout the country, there are methods to purchase modular buildings directly from the product provider. Prefabricated units can often be modified to suit a specific program by adjusting the design elements of a unit without time penalties. In fact, the development of “new models” for modular construction seems most appropriate during these stressed economic times.

A modified modular model could be used during an expansion project at the county jail in Johnson County, Kansas.

“We are currently evaluating and conducting research on the various construction approaches and structural systems applicable for our 416-bed jail addition,” says Neal J. Americano, AIA, Johnson County deputy director of facilities. “A modular system is being considered mainly as a means to speed design and construction. Such a system must allow appropriate functionality of the facility while also providing the aesthetic continuity with the AIA award winning original building.”

Modular Development

Although modular units are still being utilized at correctional facilities, manufacturers have remained tied to early concepts and no significantly different new concepts have been released. And new modular systems do not appear to be in development in today’s marketplace.

One wonders why no one has taken up the challenge of new designs suitable for correctional settings, considering that most jurisdictions have an immediate need for additional bed space with limited funding streams available to them. Units that are secure and rapidly deployable and site-specific could fill the gap between need and cost.

Gregory Offner, principal at Jacobs Facilities Inc. outlined a modular unit he would like to see: “Refine the development, manufacturing, shipping and installation so a complete 200-bed housing building in modular, stackable design … fully outfitted, could be readily available to my clients.”

A key issue regarding modular units is their life expectancy. Most modular buildings on the market have a defined length of use based on the type of inmate population housed at the facility and the nature of the materials and structures employed. A product should be secure, easily maintained while simultaneously providing an environment that is suitable for prisoner containment and rehabilitation.

If the corrections community is committed to the rehabilitation of inmates, then environment plays a key element in behavioral change of those incarcerated. Modular units could also include educational, recreational, and socially relevant programs important for reorienting prisoners to return to a normal and productive life in society. n

Peter Krasnow, FAIA, is an Advisory Board Member of Correctional News and the author of “Correctional Facility Design And Detailing” (McGraw-Hill) a 1998 publication. He is a member of the AIA Justice Committee.

 

Insure that baby!!

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Modular Homes = a new construction that is cost efficient, eco friendly and can be built in a matter of days.

Many people forget about all aspects of building, including insurance. When you construct a modular, how do you insure it? Below is a useful article that identifies steps you can take to properly insure your new modular home.

Author: John Ben Insurance Options for Modular Homes

Modular homes are prefabricated structures that are built in factories and assembled at a site. These are cheaper to construct than traditional site built homes and can be customized as per specifications detailed by homeowners. Though these are built by a home builder in climate controlled factories, there are many risks associated with prefab homes, like bad weather or damage while being transported to installation site. Therefore, IT is important that homeowners should opt for insurance while buying such homes.

Many homeowners are under the wrong impression that modular homes are insured differently from site built variants. Contrary to popular belief, insurance agencies treat these structures exactly the same as traditional homes. Therefore, they insure these under the same plans, provided that the unit adheres to the HUD code. Nowadays, even a home builder can recommend an insurance company that renders all-encompassing accident covers to clients.

One of the most important insurance policies that owners should opt for is trip collision insurance. Under this, the company covers the cost of all damages suffered by the home as it is being transferred from the factory of the home builder to the installation site.

Upon installation, it is essential that buyers should get insurance cover against adverse weather conditions for their modular houses. This is vital, as windstorms, hailstorms, lightning, snow and incessant rains are known for damaging even the sturdiest of homes. Owners can also opt for insurance against fire, smoke, frozen plumbing, theft, explosion and vandalism to safeguard their homes. It must be noted that floods and earthquakes are not covered under the insurance policies of most service providers. It is a well known fact that home repairs make a sizable dent on a homeowner’s pocket. Therefore, insuring prefab homes against unprecedented repairs is a wise idea for all modular home buyers. This entails that damages which occur while repairing lighting fixtures, cabling or plumbing network will be paid for by insurance agencies. Usually, service providers offer insurance cover for the home, but add additional charges are levied for sheds and garages.

Before buying prefab houses from a home builder, people must give a thought to the reimbursement offered by the insurance company. Some of the important factors that decide the amount paid by the service provider to the homeowner are deductible levels and the neighborhood. Frequency of claims, continuous insurance coverage, quality of structure built by home builder and insurance credit as per credit history are other relevant factors that decide insurance returns on prefab homes.

To view the entire link to this article, click here: www.prfire.com

 

Modular Homes in the UK

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“The modular panels are built in the German factory to very exacting standards, using wood from sustainable sources. This project is at the cutting edge of modern methods of construction and it’s been a great experience to learn more about the approach and see it in action on site.” 

Modular Construction is becoming more popular as the days go by. This article features a construction company from the UK that paired up with a manufacturer from Germany to build houses and build them quickly!!

Seddon teams up with German manufacturer to build new homes ‘in hours 

By: Jon Land

A Stoke-on-Trent construction company has joined forces with a German manufacturer to deliver the latest innovation in building techniques at a site in the city – creating new homes built in hours.

Under a partnership between Seddon Construction and specialist off-site manufacturer Streif, flats have been built at the new North Staffs YMCA Young Persons’ Village in Hanley, through an off-site construction process.

In just four weeks, 30 flats have been built over three floors on the site, to the highest green standards.

The process began with the manufacture of the flats at Streif’s factory in Weinham – before a team of workers from the company then joined forces with Seddon in Hanley to erect the major structure.

Despite language barriers – an interpreter was needed to aid communication between both parties – the team worked without a hitch, delivering each flat in just 4.5 hours.

The approach is one of a number of innovations introduced at The YMCA Young Person’s Village to ensure the development is built with sustainability in mind.

As part of the process, Seddon Construction’s chairman Stuart Seddon made a trip to Weinham last year to find out more modular building. His son Joe – currently completing an apprenticeship at Seddon Construction – then undertook a week-long training programme at Streif to understand more about the concept, joined by Dean Parkes, an apprentice maintenance worker at North Staffs YMCA.

Joe said: “I had a really interesting time and was able to bring a lot of knowledge back to the site.

“The modular panels are built in the German factory to very exacting standards, using wood from sustainable sources.

“The wood is then insulated and clad, windows and doorframes fitted, and electrical sockets and letterboxes cut out.

“These panels were delivered to Hanley, and put in place during 650 lifts with a 55 tonne crane. Due to the fact the structure went up so quickly we could put a roof on at an early stage, making the building watertight and alleviating the usual weather concerns we face on site.

“This project is at the cutting edge of modern methods of construction and it’s been a great experience to learn more about the approach and see it in action on site.”

With the structure in place, the Seddon team are now carrying out the second fix. The precise nature of the scheme means ceilings and doors are fitted and correct to within one millimetre.

Tony Cameron, site supervisor for Strief, said: “All has gone very well with no problems. The work has been completed on time and ran smoothly.

“We had great assistance from the team at Seddon. We have given them a great product and in return they have provided us with good facilities and health and safety. I have never been to such a clean site.”

Rodney Leake, Seddon Construction’s site manager at the YMCA Young Persons’ Village, said: “I have not worked on this type of modular building before and it has been a fantastic experience.

“This approach has considerable green benefits. As the preparation work is all done off-site there is virtually no waste to deal with and as the panels are solid, insulated and airtight, so there is little heat loss.”

Danny Flynn, CEO of North Staffs YMCA, said: “We are very excited to be working with Seddon Construction and Streif. The build process has been amazing to watch, the speed on construction literally took our young customers’ breath away.

“The buildings were constructed in 28 days, and as they begin to reach completion the quality of provision is already being commented upon by customers and partners.”

 

To view the complete article, visit by clicking on www.24dash.com

CCBC Science Building Installation

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Installation of a 35,000 square foot modular building at CCBC.

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